Stories

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Beaten Biscuits Board

This beaten biscuits board was given to my mother by Hugh Wood of eastern Kentucky in 1972.

My mom made a few cookbooks and shared her recipe for beaten biscuits in those cookbooks. It is the recipe my sisters and I grew up with and what my dad remembers from his youth. Mom passed away a long time ago, so we continue her recipes. I am the one who makes the beaten biscuits for the family. I have made YouTube videos explaining how to make them, and I’ve shown different beaten biscuit boards. (We have always used he word “board,” although some people call it a “break”). The beaten biscuits we make are supposed to be soft and not hard. They have a distinctive look from the fork holes that let the air escape. If you look online, you will notice different looks. For this reason, I have named our type Western Kentucky Beaten Biscuits, as my father is from Hopkinsville.

Growing up, our parents bought a beaten biscuits board for all of us and had them motorized with a sewing machine pedal. I have bought one for each of my kids as well.

My mom and older sisters would do demonstrations with a board on the Belvedere in the 1970s.  I try to keep the art of beaten biscuits alive! I am so attached to my board that it has moved with me out west, even though it is very heavy. I have two old beaten biscuit cutters that I keep in very safe places. I treasure the memories of beaten biscuits in our life like waking to the sound of the machine’s whir when I was little, and running downstairs wanting to watch and help my mom as she made them.

I also love their taste! They are time consuming to make, but worth it!

Frances Lussky

12/14/18

Simple Snacks

I have been working on a publication for several years about quick-fix snacks that are never found in cookbooks. It concerns the Western Kentucky homemade concoctions that have no recipe, in no cookbook, and were passed down from families. I believe that they are an important part of our history that should be preserved.  The simple snacks are comfort foods usually  made just to tide us over.

This is a draft of a brochure I created inviting participants to send in their homemade snacks for the project.

Jean Merrell, Madisonville

12/14/18

Food Traditions

From cured hams to shucky beans, autumn is a season of culinary bounty in the commonwealth. In commemoration of “The Year of Kentucky Food,” the Kentucky Historical Society is collecting Kentucky MEdia Bank submissions about Kentucky food traditions from October through December. Share your stories and photos of cakes, pies, main dishes, BBQs, gardens, crops, farmers, chefs, cooks, and more. Join the conversation!

12/14/18

Governor Edward T. Breathitt and Civil Rights in Kentucky

Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt served as Kentucky’s governor from 1963 – 1967. Among his contributions to civil rights in Kentucky were his efforts in the passage of the 1966 Kentucky Civil Rights Act, which banned discrimination in public accommodations and employment. Breathitt also worked alongside UK president John Oswald in recruiting Nathaniel Northington.

In this audio clip, Gov. Breathitt talks about civil rights legislation in Kentucky and also his role in working with the University of Kentucky to recruit Nathaniel Northington.

 

(The interview is part of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Oral History Project, Kentucky Oral History Commission, Kentucky Historical Society: http://passtheword.ky.gov/collection/civil-rights-movement-kentucky-oral-history-project)

12/14/18

A Historic Meeting – Kentucky vs. Mississippi – September 30, 1967

September 30, 1967 marks the 50th anniversary of the first integrated football game in the SEC between the University of Kentucky and the University of Mississippi. Following the tragic death of Greg Page on September 29, Nathaniel Northington became the first African American player to play in an SEC football game.

UK Team Photo Featured in UK-Ole Miss Program, September 30, 1967. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

UK Team Photo Featured in UK-Miss Program, September 30, 1967.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Individual player photos included in the UK-Ole Miss football game program, September 30, 1967. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Individual player photos included in the UK-Ole Miss football game program, September 30, 1967.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Cover of UK-Miss Football Game, September 30, 1967. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Cover of UK-Miss Football Game, September 30, 1967.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

12/14/18

Charles Bradshaw, UK Football Coach

Charles Bradshaw, head coach of the University of Kentucky football team from 1962 to 1968. Bradshaw played a role in signing the first African American players, Nathaniel Northington and Greg Page, to UK’s football team.

Head UK football coach Charles Bradshaw. University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

Head UK football coach Charles Bradshaw.
University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

12/14/18

Greg Page’s Lasting Legacy in UK Football

In 1965, UK recruited Nathaniel Northington to play football for the UK Wildcats – a few weeks later UK football coach Charles Bradshaw signed Greg Page from Middlesboro, Kentucky. Northington and Page pushed for further integration and by the fall of August 1967, other African American players were signed, including Wilbur Hackett and Houston Hogg.

Tragedy struck, however, during practice in August, leaving Greg Page paralyzed from the neck down. Page died on September 29, one day before Northington broke the SEC’s color barrier in the September 30, 1967 game against the University of Mississippi.

Team photo of Greg Page, one of UK football's first African American players. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Team photo of Greg Page, one of UK football’s first African American players.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Greg Page's parents at Commonwealth Stadium. The University of Kentucky honored Page by naming the Greg Page Apartments in his memory. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Greg Page’s parents at Commonwealth Stadium. The University of Kentucky honored Page by naming the Greg Page Apartments in his memory.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

12/14/18

UK President John W. Oswald and the SEC

John Oswald served as the University of Kentucky’s sixth president from 1963 – 1968. Although a short tenure at the helm of the university, Oswald’s progressive stance on academics and integration steered UK toward the recruitment of African American players.

Oswald picked up where his predecessor, former UK president Frank Dickey, left off by guiding behind-the-scenes conversations regarding the racial desegregation of the SEC. Concerned over Kentucky’s future in the SEC and the overall survival of the conference, UK athletics director Bernie Shively and Auburn athletics director Jeff Beard proposed a plan in which teams would play five permanent conference opponents and two additional teams on a rotating basis. This plan laid the early foundation for today’s conference schedule in the SEC.

UK President John Oswald during an interview in 1963. University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

UK President John Oswald during an interview in 1963.
University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center

12/14/18

UK and the SEC

This section of UK's Memorial Gymnasium floor has been preserved by the Kentucky Historical Society. UK's desire to integrate its athletic teams briefly threatened its membership in the SEC in the 1960s.

This section of UK’s Memorial Gymnasium floor has been preserved by the Kentucky Historical Society. UK’s desire to integrate its athletic teams briefly threatened its membership in the SEC in the 1960s.

12/14/18

How UK Football Broke the SEC Color Barrier

Today’s Southeastern Conference is a place where student-athletes of all colors and ethnicities are welcome. But in the 1960s, it was a different – many SEC teams refused to play against people of color. The University of Kentucky changed that when it partnered with Gov. Edward Breathitt to challenge the SEC color barrier. The result? The historic day 50 years ago on September 30, 1967, when UK defensive back Nate Northington became the first African American to play in the SEC as the Wildcats took on Ole Miss. Share your memories and personal collections surrounding this monumental event.

12/14/18
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